Well then...

Music, monkeys, and mayhem. Also, a lot of alliteration.
beatonna:

Look what’s here, it’s comics!  Click and go read em.  From the news post:
Hello my friends!It’s been a while. I’m trying to stretch these comic making muscles again, so here are a load of sketchy sillies. In the past year, I’ve been doing some work in books and tv, as I’ve mentioned, some of it working out and some of it not. But I’m very excited to tell you that I just finished this book with Scholastic, which should be out next fall! It’s a lot of fun and I hope you will like it! I’m working on the sequel to the Hark A Vagrant book next with Drawn and Quarterly, so good news, you’ll be seeing comics more frequently! And I miss making them.

beatonna:

Look what’s here, it’s comics!  Click and go read em.  From the news post:

Hello my friends!

It’s been a while. I’m trying to stretch these comic making muscles again, so here are a load of sketchy sillies. In the past year, I’ve been doing some work in books and tv, as I’ve mentioned, some of it working out and some of it not. But I’m very excited to tell you that I just finished this book with Scholastic, which should be out next fall! It’s a lot of fun and I hope you will like it! 

I’m working on the sequel to the Hark A Vagrant book next with Drawn and Quarterly, so good news, you’ll be seeing comics more frequently! And I miss making them.

Ultimately, the idea that the United States can stand aside from global developments is as illusory as the notion, common among neocons and paleo-cons, that it could use military force to reshape the world to its design. With demons on the rise, our shrunken world needs the United States, however tattered its image, to stand up for the values and norms it claims to represent.

John Cassidy on the problem with many Americans tuning out the chaos overseas: http://nyr.kr/1A6hIUG (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

What The Today Show Totally Missed With Its Coverage of Michael Moore’s Wealth

workingamerica:

blog_lauer-moore

Documentary filmmaker Michael Moore, the director of films like Roger and Me and Bowling for Columbine, and his wife Kathleen Glynn are separating after 22 years. The proceedings have revealed to the public the extent of Michael Moore’s finances, including a large mansion in Michigan.

This morning, The Today Show seized on this news to portray Moore as a hypocrite: how could someone with a “blue collar” image, they ask, have this much money?

Let’s be absolutely clear: that question is ridiculous.

First of all, someone with a blue collar upbringing can most certainly attain great wealth over the course of their life and still maintain the composure, sensibility, and ideals they were raised with. That’s common sense. It’s called economic mobility, and it is something that Americans have felt great pride in throughout our history.

But let’s make something else abundantly clear: Michael Moore and other critics of our economic system do not oppose wealth.

Seriously. This has been a libel against all economic progressives, displayed prominently during the 2012 election when Mitt Romney and others accused President Obama of opposing the very idea of wealth and success (thus the obsession with taking “you didn’t build that” out of context). It’s the insult hurled at anyone who criticizes big money in politics: we are told that we are “jealous” of the Koch Brothers’ massive wealth, because why else would we say mean things about them?

And The Today Show bought completely into this frame, calling Moore’s politics “contradictory” with his big house and his full bank account.

But it’s not contradictory, because Michael Moore doesn’t oppose wealth. Senator Elizabeth Warren, another target of these claims, doesn’t oppose wealth. The millions of Working America members who take action to address income inequality don’t oppose wealth, pursuing wealth, or accruing wealth.

What we oppose, and will continue to fight against, is the following:

The use of massive wealth to rig our democracy in your favor. We respect the right of Charles and David Koch to grow their business, to hire workers and put out a product. But in addition to running a business, they have spent hundreds of millions of dollars on lobbyists, think tanks, and a constellation of political organizations to insure their company’s success at the expense of others.

For instance, there’s nothing “free market” about the Kochs’ efforts to tax consumers of solar energy in an effort to keep them addicted to the petroleum they produce. If Apple lobbied for a law that would add extra taxes for Android users, there would be an enormous outcry. This isn’t different.

The use of massive wealth to destroy the ladder of economic mobility that helped create that wealth in the first place. Anyone who runs a business has the right to manage their workforce as they see fit, within the bounds of the law. But businessmen like the Koch Brothers, Art Pope, Rex Sinquefield, and Dick DeVos don’t stop there. Through campaign donations, TV advertisements, lobbyists, and other tactics, they have tried (and often succeeded) in changing laws that protect workers’ rights, wages, and retirement. The DeVos family’s near single-handed funding of the “right to work” effort in Michigan is exhibit A.

Knocking rungs off of the ladder of economic mobility doesn’t create wealth, it destroys it.

The use of massive wealth to deceive consumers. Elizabeth Warren didn’t set up the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) because of a hate of Wall Street and the people who work there. Yet, Wall Street banks spent a fortune lobbying against the creation of the CFPB, and they continue to make weakening the agency and broader Wall Street reform a key priority.

Warren understood that when information was presented clearly to consumers–without tricks, traps, and hidden fees–they would be better able to select the products that worked for them. That understanding would allow Wall Street companies to compete on a level playing field, with the best plans and products winning. If that’s not capitalism, what is?

So can Michael Moore criticize inequality while enjoying economic success? Absolutely. Moore just happens to be one of those wealthy people who doesn’t feel the need to use his wealth to destroy others’ ability to become wealthy as well.

That’s not being contradictory, that’s being decent.

[The DIY underground] has no effective way to repel its own co-optation by parasitic marketers, no way to reach out to the unconverted, no way to mediate between the annihilation of purity and the danger of selling out, and finally no way to combat the political and economic machine that is the cause of the alienation it protests. By looking for cultural and individual solutions to what are essentially structural and societal problems, and locked into the contradiction of being wed to the society it hates, the underground inevitably fails.

altcomics:

Stephen Duncombe

(via darrylayo)